Who controls the water in the Jordan Valley?

By the Jordan Valley team, 

(PHOTO A) 09.12.15. Baddala, Jordan Valley, Palestine. Village leader - Abdullah Sawafta. Photo EAPPI/P. Longden

09.12.15. Baddala, Jordan Valley, Palestine. Village leader – Abdullah Sawafta. Photo EAPPI/P. Longden

Tanks took my water…

Abudallah Sawafta, age 78, a senior resident in Bardala, the northernmost village in the Jordan Valley, occupied Palestine, describes what happened when the Israeli military visited his village.

“They (the Israeli water company and the Army) took our fresh water well. They connected another pipe and just took the water – and now they sell our own water back to us at very high prices”

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Al Hadidya: bulldozers razed this hamlet

By the Jordan Valley team,
This blog shares the recent history of a small Bedouin Hamlet, Al Hadidya, in the northern Jordan Valley. The majority of the Jordan Valley is in Area C, and the Israeli government has both civil and security authority over the 60,000 Palestinians living there. Al Hadidya is located near the illegal Israeli settlement of Ro’i and is built on land leased from the residents of Tamoun and Tubas. However, while Ro’i thrives, Al Hadidya’s residents struggles to meet even their most basic needs. The story of this village, like so many other Area C communities, is one of demolitions and displacement

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A “Stop Work Order” for a Completed House: A Kafkaesque Story

By the Jordan Valley team, 

12.10.15. Jordan Valley, Humsa. Mahmod with the orders given to him. EAPPI / J. Puukki

12.10.15. Jordan Valley, Humsa. Mahmod with the  stop work orders issued to him by the Israeli authorities. Photo EAPPI/J. Puukki

This is Mahmod. He lives in a herding community in the north of the Jordan Valley. Mahmod lives with his family of eight, this includes two sons, two daughters, his daughter-in-law, and two grandchildren. The family earns their livelihood by herding sheep and keeping other animals, such as chickens. They used to live in a concrete house, which provided a living space for the family and a shelter for their animals. In October 2014 the family received a “stop work order” from the Israeli authorities despite having finished their home three years before. Because they failed to “stop the construction” on a home that was already completed, their home was demolished in August 2015 by the Israeli military.

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